David Ray Agradecido Liner Notes
Agradecido

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1. O Ôvo (Hermeto Pascoal) 2:56
published by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp., BMI

Here is modern version of a song by Quarteto Novo, a Brazilian band from the 1960's that was especially known for both mastering and breaking traditions and "pushing the envelope" musically. This arrangement continues that tradition with modern rhythms and improvisations.

David Ray - mandolin
Tom Edwards - guitar
Mike Sugar - bass
Vince Littleton - drums
Brian Rice - pandeiro and percussion


2. Como Llora Una Estrella (Antonio Carrillo) 3:23
published by Peermusic III Ltd., BMI

This is a very popular song in Venezuela. I first learned it from a mandolin arrangement by John Reischman, and later another version by Venezuelan harpist Pascal Coulón. This guitar arrangement draws from both sources and adds some new ideas.

David Ray - guitar
Jackeline Rago - cuatro
Saul Sierra - bass
Vince Littleton - drums


3. Misturada (Mixing) (Airto Moreira) 3:02
published by Good Morning Music, administered by Bug Music, BMI

Another song originally by Quarteto Novo, and re-arranged by Airto in the 1990's. This arrangement is based on the more recent version by Airto.

David Ray - mandolin
Tom Edwards - guitar
Mike Sugar - bass
Vince Littleton - drums
Brian Rice - pandeiro


4. Carnaval Llanero (Venezuelan Folklore / David Ray) 2:22
new material published by Periphera, ASCAP

This "joropo" rhythm is typically played for the carnival time in the Llanero plains of Venezuela. Based on a very old song that dates back to the time of the Conquistadors in the 1500's and played on harp, I adapted this for guitar and added a new section.

David Ray - guitar
Jackeline Rago - cuatro and maracas
Saul Sierra - bass


5. Lamentos (Pixinguinha - Vinicius de Morales) 4:55
published by Multitune, Inc., BMI

This piece, written in the early 1900's was originally performed by mandolin backed by a full classical orchestra, then rearranged in the 1960's by guitar greats Baden Powell and Bola Sete. This arrangement draws from all these sources and adds some new ideas.

David Ray - mandolin
Tom Edwards - guitar
Steven Strauss - bass
Vince Littleton - drums
Brian Rice - pandeiro


6. Andre de Sapato Novo (Andre Victor Correa) 3:44
published by Irmaos Vitale S.A. - Industria e Comercio, BMI

Chôro music is a Brazilian style that became popular around the turn of the 20th century. Chôro music integrates African rhythms with European melodies and musical forms, and anticipated world music by a full century. Its popularity especially soared in the 1940's due largely to the popularity of Brazilian mandolin master Jacob do Bandolim. Here are some new arrangements of Chôro songs for a modern audience.

David Ray - mandolin
Helen Holt - clarinet
Tom Edwards - guitar
Steven Strauss - bass
Vince Littleton - drums
Brian Rice - pandeiro


7. Assanhado (Jacob do Bandolim, Baby Consuelo) 3:09
published by BMG Songs Inc. obo BMG Music Pub. Brasil Ltd., ASCAP

This is another popular Chôro song. The primary rhythm instrument of Chôro music is the pandeiro, a hand drum very similar to the tambourine. The pandeiro technique is very intricate and requires a lifetime of study, and the pandeiro often leads the rhythm section of the band.

David Ray - mandolin
Tom Edwards - guitar
Steven Strauss - bass
Vince Littleton - drums
Brian Rice - pandeiro


8. Manha de Carnaval (Luis Bonfa, Antonio Maria) 4:06
published by Chappell & Co., ASCAP

This is one of the most well-known Brazilian songs outside Brazil. One of the first Bossa Novas ever written, it was used as the theme in the famed 1959 movie Black Orpheus.

David Ray - mandolin
Tom Edwards - guitar
Steven Strauss - bass
Vince Littleton - drums
Brian Rice - pandeiro


9. Euzkadi (Steve Erquiaga) 5:59
published by Log & Log Music, ASCAP

The composer is an jazz artist originally from Spain, who now resides in the Bay Area. The song has a unique blend of Spanish and jazz influences.

David Ray - mandolin
Tom Edwards - guitars
Mike Sugar - bass
Vince Littleton - drums and percussion


10. Receita de Samba (Jacob do Bandolim) 4:50
published by BMG Songs Inc. obo BMG Music Pub. Brasil Ltd., ASCAP

In Chôro music, the bass voice is provided by a 7-string guitar that has an extra string in the low range. Typically, the bass lines are intricate runs played in counterpoint with the melody. Here is a good example of a 7-string guitar played in the traditional style.

David Ray - mandolin
Ron Galen - 7-string guitar
Vince Littleton - drums
Brian Rice - pandeiro


11. Sentimiento En El Río Apure (R. A. Aparicio) 3:20
published by SACVEN, ASCAP

This is an original song by Venezuelan harpist Rafael Angel Aparicio written in the Venezuelan folklore style. I first heard this song from a recording by mandolinist Cristóbal Soto, and transposed and arranged the song for guitar.

David Ray - guitar
Jackeline Rago - cuatro and maracas
Saul Sierra - bass


Songs arranged by David Ray unless otherwise noted
Tracks were recorded at Prairie Sun Studios, Cotati, CA
Engineer: Steve Fontano
Assistant engineer: Matt Bridges
and at Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, CA
Engineer: Steve Fontano
Assistant Engineer: James Willetts
Mixed and mastered by Johannes Luley - www.mysonictemple.com
Band photo by William Binzen - www.folioluxe.com
Produced by David Ray

Thanks to Mark Rennick, Steven Hart, Leslie Evers, Radim Zenkl and Ned Hearn for production assistance. Thanks to John Reischman for exposing me to Venezuelan mandolin music, and to David Grisman for releasing the great works of Jacob Bandolim in the U.S.A. Special thanks to Jackeline Rago for her teaching and inspiration with Venezuelan folklore music.